Check in. Relax. Take a shower.

Posted: October 14, 2010 in events, film

Film is forever.

The audiences of today desperately need an education when it comes to great, classic cinema.  They’re much too forgetful and going out to the movies isn’t an experience anymore as it is just a way to kill a Friday night.  Everybody is herded like cattle into movie theaters to watch sparkly, emo vampires or the latest attempt to prove Jennifer Aniston can actually be a box office draw, and they lose the excitement that comes with anticipation, whether it be over the stars of the film, the director or the subject matter.

Which is why I loved my own movie experience last night

Cineplex, the Canadian theater chain has released a schedule of classic films to be shown at their theaters, booked as far as next summer.  Among the movies to be shown are iconic pieces such as The Maltese Falcon, It’s A Wonderful Life and Spartacus.  Last night, a legendary tale of terror played to a few dozen patrons and I was among them, seated smack-dab in the middle of the front row.

I watched Psycho on the big screen.

Galaxy Cinemas in Saskatoon played the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock gem and both the picture and sound were amazing.  The film itself is no stranger to me;  I bought the collector’s edition DVD long ago, but there was no way I was going to miss witnessing it in an actual movie theater so close to Halloween.

For those that have been living completely under a rock for the last 50 years, I’ll let the Internet Movie Database give you a brief description of the plot:

“A young woman steals $40,000 from her employer’s client, and subsequently encounters a young motel proprietor too long under the domination of his mother.”

That’s pretty  much it in a nutshell.  Add to that a chilling musical score, immaculate set pieces and excellent performances by Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh and it makes for an iconic film that’s still talked about today, and for good reason.

I will say that I wasn’t impressed with the Saskatoon audience I watched it with.  They mistook key scenes for comedy and their laughter really drained the suspense and terror involved.  I blame today’s movie audience in general, as I mentioned above, and perhaps these same patrons hadn’t even seen the film before.  Again, there’s the uneducated sector of moviegoers for you.

Still, it was a great experience and only served to raise my hopes of one day seeing other classic horror films on the big screen.  C’mon, how cool would it be to see The Exorcist, Halloween or A Nightmare on Elm Street in that fashion?

If anything, last night told me there’s hope.

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